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Politically Explosive

Politically Explosive

Politically Explosive Paul Cowan recalls the harrowing career of Luke ‘Dynamite’ Dillon   'As soon as the Boers crossed into Cape Colony and Natal, reports predicted a repeat of the-Fenian raids, conspiring with the Dutch on the Pacific Coast to sabotage the naval base at Esquimalt'   ONLY WEEKS BEFORE the outbreak of the First World War an American citizen with a strong claim to being the most dangerous man in Canada walked out of Kingston Penitentiary a free man. Luke “Dynamite” Dillon had been jailed in May 1900 for masterminding an attempt to blow up Lock 24 on the Welland Canal...

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Totally Bogus Viking Dudes

Totally Bogus Viking Dudes

Reviewers praised Neil Price's Children of the Ash for "rescu[ing] Viking history from the grasp of white supremacists ... not by asserting any sort of moral superiority for the Vikings ... but by restoring their rich and strange particularity." Even so, most reviewers missed the key bit of information about the Norse: that they were ultimately converted by Benedictine monks from England and went on to adorn Christendom in its most flourishing age — and that the Scandinavian countries continue (and not by accident) to be on the whole among the most civilized places in the world to live. Read on for the context:     Updated...

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The Third Eye

The Third Eye

Autonomous signals intelligence has put Canada at the heart of Five Eyes sharing — writes Maria A. Robson   CANADA FOUNDED ITS first intelligence agency, the Communications Branch of the National Research Council, in 1946. The word “Security” was added in 1973 and since 1975 it has been known as the Communications Security Establishment (CSE). In the nationalist mood following the Second World War, some policymakers assumed that the development of autonomous signals intelligence would allow the country to go its own way and assert independence from Great Britain. As it happened, this expectation fit nicely into a colony-to-nation narrative. However, declassified...

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In Search of Quebec Conservatives

In Search of Quebec Conservatives

From the Archives: The Dorchester Review has been covering the distinctive conservatism of Quebec since our premier issue in 2011. Here's D.C. Belanger's review from that issue.

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RIP Fraser Sutherland 1946-2021

RIP Fraser Sutherland 1946-2021

DR readers will have seen poems and prose by Fraser Sutherland in our pages over the past couple of years. He attended our Toronto event in 2019. His review of a tribute to Al Purdy at 100, published in our Autumn/Winter 2020 edition, is reproduced here. As far as we know it was his last published work of prose, though some posthumous works may, we hope, follow. So far there is also this brief notice.  

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