The Team

C.P. Champion, PhD, FRCGS, served as Senior Policy Advisor to the Minister of National Defence and the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration. He is the author of Relentless Struggle: Saving the Army Reserve (Durnovaria, 2019) and The Strange Demise of British Canada (McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2010), and edits The Dorchester Review, which he founded in 2011. He was born in Calgary, grew up in West Vancouver, and was educated at the University of British Columbia; Magdalene College, Cambridge; and McGill University. Recently, at the age of 46, he joined the Army Reserve as a private and during the writing of his second book completed infantry training with the rank of Guardsman, basic winter warfare, and three 21-km Army Runs. He has travelled in over a dozen countries, and enjoys skiing, cooking, marksmanship, and learning Italian. He lives in Ottawa with his wife, their son and daughter, and a labrador retriever puppy.

 

John Pepall is the author of Against Reform, published in 2010 by the University of Toronto Press. He took degrees in philosophy and politics at Trent University and law at York University. He was called to the Ontario bar in 1978 and practised civil litigation in Toronto. He was a Progressive Conservative candidate in the Ontario election of 1990. He has written on politics, history, the law and the arts for The Idler, The Literary Review of Canada, The Ottawa Citizen, The Times Literary Supplement, The National Post, and other publications. He contributed a chapter to Rethinking the Constitution, published by Oxford University Press.

   

 

James W.J. Bowden started the blog Parliamentum in 2011, is a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Parliamentary and Political Law (published by Carswell), and has become an internationally-recognised expert on Canadian political history and Canada’s system of Responsible Government. Educated at Carleton University, he wrote his M.A. thesis comparing the Crown’s authority over dissolution of parliament in Canada and the United Kingdom, and his other articles have appeared in the Canadian Parliamentary Review, Constitutional Forum, and the Commonwealth Law Bulletin. He lives in Ottawa.

 

 

Phyllis Parham Reeve has written about local and personal history in her three solo books and in contributions to journals and multi-author publications. Her specific interests embrace colonial and post-colonial life in southern Quebec, where she maintains family ties, and in Fiji, where she was born. Her current home on Gabriola Island, British Columbia, has inspired explorations of settler relations with the Snuneymuxw First Nation and  the Japanese-Canadian community. A graduate of Bishop's University and the University of British Columbia, she studies modernist literature and art, and collects bestiaries. Her writing appears in Amphora (the journal of the Alcuin Society), in BC BookWorld, in publications of the Gabriola Historical and Museum Society and online in The Ormsby Review.  She is rumoured to vote Green. http://www.phyllisreeve.com

 

F.H. Buckley is a Foundation Professor at George Mason University’s Scalia School of Law. His most recent books are American Secession: The Looming Threat of a National Breakup, The Republican Workers PartyThe Republic of Virtue, and The Once and Future King, all published by Encounter Books. He has been a visiting fellow at the University of Chicago Law School, and has also taught at McGill Law School in Montreal, the Sorbonne (Paris II), and Sciences Po in Paris. He is a citizen of Canada and also became an American citizen on Tax Day, April 15, 2014. He lives in Alexandria, Virginia. http://fhbuckley.com/

    

 

David Twiston Davies was born at Westmount, PQ, and lives in Great Britain where he was on the staff of The Daily Telegraph for 39 years. He has been a champion of the Imperial connection since he was called a "yank" at boarding school at the age of eight; he did not know what it meant, but instinctively knew he disliked it. After going to Downside, he worked for the East Anglian Daily Times, then joined the Winnipeg Free Press for two years before returning to Britain to join the Telegraph, where he was diary editor, letters editor and chief obituary writer. He helped the late Hugh Massingberd to create an authoritative and amusing obituaries section, with the encouragement of then-proprietor Conrad Black. He has edited a volume of Canadian obituaries, three of service obituaries, one of naval subjects and one of Imperial subjects and edited a volume of letters to Telegraph. Since retiring from the paper in 2010, he has written reviews and features for the TelegraphCatholic Herald, and Salisbury Review.

   

 

Philip Marchand was for 19 years the literary and film critic at the Toronto Star, and for 9 years books critic at the National Post. Born and raised in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, and descended from French settlers in Quebec, he is the author of Ghost Empire: How the French Almost Conquered North America (McClelland & Stewart, 2005); Deadly Spirits, a crime novel (Stoddart, 1994); and the definitive Marshall McLuhan: The Medium and the Messenger (Random House, 1989; MIT Press, 1998). Some of his writings have been collected as Just Looking, Thank You (Macmillan, 1976) and Ripostes (Porcupine’s Quill, 1998).

   

 

Alastair Sweeny was born in Toronto and has a BA in English and History from the University of Toronto, and a Master of Letters and Doctor of Philosophy from Trinity College, Dublin. He has served as a private and public sector consultant. In 1989, he produced Canadisk, Canada's first multimedia CD-ROM, a joint venture with Encyclopædia Britannica, and has produced and written corporate histories of Investors Group, Alberta Energy Company (now Encana) and Magna International, among others. He is author of several books, including a biography of Sir George-Étienne Cartier (1976). BlackBerry Planet was published by Wiley in 2009. Black Bonanza, on Canada's oilsands, was published by Wiley in 2010, followed by Fire Along the Frontier: Great Battles of the War of 1812, by Dundurn in 2012. He is currently VP of a cybersecurity software company, and is writing a biography of Thomas Mackay and the founding of Ottawa.

 

 

Michael R. Jackson Bonner, DPhil (Oxon), is a political advisor and writer with a background in Classics and the Late Antique Middle East. He attended Ridley College, Upper Canada College, and Trinity College, Toronto. Though a specialist in Late Antique Iran, he is well-read in pre-Islamic and early Islamic history, and has travelled widely throughout the Middle East. His doctoral thesis (Oxford 2014) dealt with Iranian history and was published by Res OrientalesToward the end of his doctorate, Michael became a policy adviser to a cabinet minister in Ottawa. He is now an independent historian of Iran, and Director of Policy to an Ontario cabinet minister. He lives in Toronto with his wife and two sons. His next book, The Last Empire of Iran, is an exhaustive narrative of the Sasanid dynasty, and will appear in early 2020.