Featured Articles — Public History

“They Were Not Forced”

1619 Project Aboriginals Brian Giesbrecht Canada History Debates History Wars Indian Residential Schools Indigenous Kamloops Nina Green Politically Corrective History Politics & Government Public History Thomas Flanagan

“They Were Not Forced”

The claim that 150,000 status Indian children were 'forced' to attend residential schools is misleading at best, write Nina Green, Brian Giesbrecht, and Tom Flanagan. For example, enforcement of compulsory attendance was often lax to non-existent.

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China's History as Destiny

Beijing Charles Burton China Communism Today Corrective History Delenda Est Carthago Education History Wars Public History War & Weaponry

China's History as Destiny

By Charles Burton. Xi Jinping's efforts to revitalize Communist Party rule and stave off decay rely on reinforcing strictly Leninist political structures, terror — and lies about China's Official History. From our archives.

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Napoleon and the French Canadians

Biography French Canada History Debates Men and Ideas Napoleon Bonaparte Public History Quebec Serge Joyal War War & Weaponry

Napoleon and the French Canadians

By Serge Joyal. All countries create myths to adumbrate their aspirations and to reflect an image of their national identity. Such was the myth of Napoleon in France and, as we shall see, even in French Canada.

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Not Guilty: Sir John A. Macdonald & the Genocide Fetish

1619 Project Biography Cancel Culture Colonial Era Corrective History Double Standards First Nations History Debates History Wars Indian Residential Schools Indigenous Men and Ideas Public History Sir John A. Macdonald Statue-Toppling

Not Guilty: Sir John A. Macdonald & the Genocide Fetish

Genocide? Quite the contrary. Patrice Dutil explains why Sir John A. Macdonald is NOT GUILTY.

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The Myth of the 'Militia Myth'

Battle Honours Defence of Canada featured Militia Myth Public History rhenderson Robert Henderson War of 1812

The Myth of the 'Militia Myth'

  BULLETS BEGAN TO whistle by him as Captain John Jenkins neared his target. Drifting snow impeded his every step. Opening the front of his long woollen greatcoat had helped his movement but still it was a struggle. Jenkins’ men of the Glengarry Light Infantry Fencibles had kept pace with him, along with the detachment of Canadian militia under his command. The plan that morning of February 22, 1813 had his force crossing the frozen St. Lawrence River to cut off escape by the American forces at Ogdensburg, New York. However from the increasing muzzle flashes ahead, it was clear his...

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